Ten Top

I’ve heard some whining about the year in music, not-so-great, and I say pshaw. 2018 was lovely; there was so much good music that my top ten albums of the year didn’t even make it onto the high-profile end-of-year lists I’ve been reading. There’s enough hi-test material in 2018 to populate a thousand lists! I’ve given you a run-down of the run-up to this post (on Twitter), and I’ll probably recap those in a follow-on post. But here, at the end of all things 2018, is my Top Ten.

10. The Essex Green: Hardly Electronic

The Essex Green: Hardly Electronic
Surprise! It’s been over a decade since we saw anything from these gentle New York pop craftspersons, and I can’t imagine a better reunion opener than Sloane Ranger, with its golden Farfisa tones and classic harmonies. The band fairly skips through a masterclass multi-genre workout before waltzing back out of our lives again. Don’t wait another decade, please.

09. Natalie Prass: The Future And The Past

Natalie Prass: The Future and The Past
Prass’s pop-soul leanings get a shot in the arm on this follow-up to her self-titled debut. I can almost see her in the studio, dropping right into the pocket with her crack session musicians. Abe and I were a little obsessed with this album this summer: he learned Never Too Late on the piano, and I played Sisters probably one time too often. Prass’s delightful inversion of the Carpenter’s Close To You is as witty as a pop song gets. I can see this playing at parties for years to come.

08. Jon Hopkins: Singularity

Jon Hopkins: Singularity
When they talk about electronic/dance music being warm, or humanistic, or textured, or coaxing organic forms out of electrical impulses, I usually wonder what they mean. But in the future when I can’t put it into words, I’m going to point to this album. Emotionally affecting programmatic music; revelatory, even.

07. Amen Dunes: Freedom

Amen Dunes: Freedom
Damon McMahon’s mumbling, shambling, warbling, consonant-clipping and vowel-altering delivery gave me a thrilling emotional recall of the feelings I had listening to those early R.E.M. albums for the first time. And those R.E.M. albums were fundamental to my developing aesthetic for pop music. Combine that with McMahon’s expressed desire to write songs in the mode of Jackson’s Thriller and this album was probably always a surgical strike on my playlist this year. Hard to understand, impossible to ignore.

06. Dick Stusso: In Heaven

Dick Stusso: In Heaven
The flat drums, tamborine, and buzzing bass of Modern Music, under Stusso’s weary baritone and accented by bolts of electric guitar with the reverb on. When he sings “I’m just looking for a good time and a little cash,” well, that’s all I’m looking for too. And then he pushes the track into a weird effects-laden bridge, and drop-cuts the ending, and oh man, just take my money.

05. Emma Louise: Lilac Everything

Emma Louise: Lilac Everything
How do you set yourself apart from the myriad balladeers practicing mid-tempo lovesongs? Pitch-shift your voice down into androgynous territory, make yourself sound like a sensitive man, and then sing about sensitive men without changing your pronouns, so we’re forced to engage with the questions of love and desire from multiple angles at the same time. Brilliant.

04. S. Carey: Hundred Acres

S. Carey: Hundred Acres
This is the kind of delicate pastoral beauty I can lose myself in over and over forever. I don’t even care what it’s about, just keep singing and playing like this and I’m done for.

03. Rae Morris: Someone Out There

Rae Morris: Someone Out There
I’m not a radio pop person, but a few years of Taylor Swift/Lorde/Rihanna fandom from certain pre-teens in my household has fixed a crack in my hip-dad facade. I brought Morris’s album home and decided to like it unapologetically. And then I really did like it unapologetically, and it’s had wicked staying power over the year. Do It might be my platonic ideal of a perfect pop single. And the pre-teens liked it, too.

02. Caroline Rose: LONER

Caroline Rose: LONER
I had this locked down in February.

01. Wye Oak: The Louder I Call, The Faster It Runs

Wye Oak: The Louder I Call, The Faster It Runs
I didn’t get Jenn Wasner before, but I’m 100% on board now. Call it clarity, transparency– whatever she was trying to communicate, it finally clicked in her songwriting here. Plaintive, inventive, trancendental, rhythmic. Burns down the whole barn at times. I listen to this album and I just don’t want it to end: this kind of wall-to-wall energetic, creative rock experience is the gold standard.

In praise of Famous Tracheotomies

I’ve spent the past week in frequent tears, emotionally undone for some reason by the opening track from Okkervil River’s In The Rainbow Rain, “Famous Tracheotomies.”

Morgan Enos in Billboard opines that the song is self-explanatory, but I think its genius is a little more subtle than that. On first listen, the synopsis goes: Okkervil songwriter Will Sheff almost died as a baby. He had to have a tracheotomy, and has lived with the scar and the knowledge that he almost didn’t make it, since then. Sheff goes on, in a series of verses, to recount the sad declines of other famous tracheotomy recipients: Gary Coleman, Mary Wells, Dylan Thomas, whose wife got so drunk the night he died that she “had to be restrained.”

At this point, you know the song is going somewhere, but you don’t know where. It seems a little on the nose. Somewhere relatively dark. The last verse starts in the same style: Ray Davies, age 13, in a hospital in London. The pattern repetition has lulled you into complacency— you know the story, here’s another example. The nurses wheel him out onto the balcony to get some air. He looks out over the river, and we roll into the last line.

“And as that evening sun did sink / on London and the river and that freaked-out future Kink”

You already knew that. Ray Davies, along with his brother Dave, is the chief songwriter for the most working class of British bands, The Kinks. Famous for songs about everyday men and women, working stiffs, down-on-their-luck folks caught up in the conundrums of their time. You could see Sheff identifying with Davies even, drawing a line between Davies’s art and his own.

“Waterloo lit up for one sick kid”

Sheff’s lulling repetition has blinded you to the other identification he makes with Davies, that of the everyman who comes close to death but pulls through and makes indelible art. With that buried lede, “Waterloo,” the entire song opens up instantaneously. You know what Waterloo signifies. “Waterloo Sunset” has been at times pegged as the greatest British rock song, the quintessential story of blue collar knobs finding beauty amid the drudgery. You instantly hear in your mind “As long as I gaze on Waterloo sunset, I am in paradise,” and Sheff has already painted the picture of Davies doing exactly that.

“And at 23, he wrote a song about it”

And as you’re hearing Sheff and seeing Davies watching the Waterloo sunset, you hear that last line, and you know that Davies still has his whole career ahead of him, and there’s hope, that the song is about hope. It’s not about dissolution.

It’s about hope.

In the masterstroke, the song then begins to cycle into a wordless repetition of the “Waterloo Sunset” melody, and the chord structure is revealed to have been a companion to Waterloo Sunset all along, and Sheff a direct descendant of a long line of hurting artists trying to find beauty in the everyday. And then, you get to meditate on the song itself, without words – the lyrical melody of the opening verse of “Waterloo Sunset” – and you feel something. Something ineffable and filled with hope.

It’s an old truism – your pain is not the end of your story, it may set the stage for your greatest achievements – but it’s as elegantly painted here as it has ever been, in a subversive and unexpectedly moving way: Waterloo Sunset’s fine.

Hashtag #AOTY 2017

Twitter has been less than ideal for expounding on the music I’m listening to. I’ve been doing year-end lists on Twitter for the last few years, one album a day near the end of December, counting down to my Album Of The Year (complete with hashtags, #aoty, natch). Here, though, is a great big blog, just begging for a long-form list. So I’m going to recast my Top Ten of 2017.

10 through 6, unranked:

Big Thief - CapacityBig Thief: Capacity. I was hooked by the stark vulnerability of this songwriting, but I was reeled in by the rock’n’roll perfection of two singles, the above linked ‘Shark Smile’ and the devastating ‘Black Diamonds.’ Adrianne Lenker’s approach is on target for me right now, somewhere vaguely in the female singer-songwriter neighborhood but I don’t know how to describe exactly where.


Blond Ambition - Slow All OverBlond Ambition: Slow All Over. Ex-Cops, Brian Harding’s previous band, is responsible for a personal fav, True Hallucinations, so I was geeked to see this new offering. Same ranging musical curiosity applies, leans more pop than rock.


Four Tet - New EnergyFour Tet: New Energy. New Energy‘s lead single grabbed me and stayed with me all year, and the rest of the tracks here (‘Lush’ is another standout) carry weight. Years in and Kieran Hebden still just… does it, for me. I’m waiting for the fall-off, where he starts making albums that don’t appeal to me. Hasn’t happened yet, thank you Jesus.


Hiss Golden Messenger - Hallelujah AnyhowHiss Golden Messenger: Hallelujah Anyhow. M C Taylor is the man of the hour in the Neds-Fox household, so we looked with anticipation to this album. A little less hard-hitting than last year’s masterpiece Heart Like A Levee, but no less important, and worth the price for the studio version of ‘John The Gun’ alone. Few are doing conscious work against the darkness today like HGM.


Iron & Wine - Beast EpicIron & Wine: Beast Epic. Sam Beam hits me (weirdly) somewhere in the same spot that’s activated by The Weather Station and Big Thief and Natalie Prass and Innocence Mission. It’s not Americana or folk or singer-songwriter, it’s not gendered… it’s hard for me to put my finger on it. There’s something about the closeness, the vulnerability, the lyricism. Beast Epic is a return to form for Iron & Wine, and I for one welcome it.


5 – 1, ranked:

Emily Haines / Soft Skeleton: Choir of the Mind5. Emily Haines / Soft Skeleton: Choir of the Mind. I love South San Gabriel but I can’t really get into Centromatic. In the same way, I’m not keen on Metric but I played the crap out of the Soft Skeleton stuff that came out about 10 years ago. Long wait, does not disappoint. Poetic/comical in a way that doesn’t privilege either, and soooo listenable.


Elbow: Little Fictions4. Elbow: Little Fictions. As with Alvvays below, we just… kept playing this one. It’s dead-center stuff for Elbow: not a revelation or a sea-change, just solidly in their wheelhouse. But, come on– do one thing this well.


The Weather Station: S/T3. The Weather Station: The Weather Station. I loved Loyalty so much that this was big on the horizon for me. Comes on punkier, and that’s actually a revelation: Lindeman’s stark, emotionally honest, literary songwriting paired with a harder focus makes these songs punch.


Alvvays: Antisocialites2. Alvvays: Antisocialites. Clayton called their debut a perfect album, and on review it turned out he was right. This came along shortly thereafter and stayed right here, hovering around #1 on my list, by sheer force of its relistenability. We* could just put this on over and over.


Aimee Mann: Mental Illness1. Aimee Mann: Mental Illness. We’ve had a thing for Mann since Magnolia (as I suspect a number of folks my age/ilk did), but honestly I’ve felt sort of hit or miss about her albums as a whole. This, however, is front to back unimpeachable. Emotionally affecting, masterclass level songwriting, crazy catchy. When the kids started memorizing the lyrics I knew it was over. Career high, flawless.


(* When I say we I mean the fam, fam).

One Year

One Year, a January mix from jnonfiction
One Year, a themed mix for January. Skews light; let’s see if 2018 can take a hint.

  1. New Year – The Breeders
  2. Valentine’s Day – Hem
  3. March – Hex
  4. April The 14th (Ruination Day Part 1) – Gillian Welch
  5. Month of May – Arcade Fire
  6. June – Over The Rhine
  7. July – The Innocence Mission
  8. August & September – The The
  9. Late October – Harold Budd / Brian Eno
  10. Rose Hip November – Vashti Bunyan
  11. New Year’s Eve – The Walkmen

Like a groundhog

Popping my head back up above ground. I’ve relied on social media to maintain an internet presence for a few years. But lately I’ve felt like there are times I want to say something requiring more than 140 (280?) characters. The tools have improved, the family has maintained a webserver against all odds… let’s see if I can’t shake off the dust and resurrect the practice.

Karen Peris contributes guest vocals to one of my surprise end-of-year finds: Lost Horizons, which represents the return of Simon Raymonde (Cocteau Twins) to music making after a few years running Bella Union. The whole album is a revelation.

Geometry

Geometry - yewknee.com Summer Mix Series 2011

GEOMETRY. A yewknee.com Summer Mix Series 2011 Mix.

Parallelograms : Linda Perhacs :: An Arc Of Doves : Harold Budd/Brian Eno :: The Lengths : The Black Keys :: Pyramid Song : Radiohead :: Um, Circles And Squares : Dosh :: Triangles And Rhombuses : Boards Of Canada :: These Points Balance : Gregor Samza :: Small Planes : The Innocence Mission :: Draw Us Lines : The Constantines :: Movement III: Linear Tableau With Intersecting Surprise : Sufjan Stevens :: Fractal Dream Of A Thing : Stereolab :: Parallelogram : Deastro :: Perfect Circle : R.E.M. :: Of Angels And Angles : The Decemberists

Wordless Christmas

Wordless Christmas

Talk talk talk. You’re tired of it. More Decking, less Yacking, that’s what you’re thinking this fine December. Ahem: this, my friend, is the Christmas Mix for you.

1. The Incarnation – Sufjan Stevens
2. Carol of the Bells – Mark O’Connor
3. The First Noel – Over The Rhine
4. Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy – Kirov Orchestra (Valery Gergiev)
5. Coal Train – Monk
6. Hark! The Herald Angels Sing – Vince Guaraldi
7. Jingle Bells – The Ventures
8. My Favorite Things – John Coltrane
9. O Little Town Of Bethlehem – Over The Rhine
10. A Little Lower Than The Angels – Monk
11. Sleigh Ride – The Ventures
12. Coffee – Kirov Orchestra (Valery Gergiev)
13. What Child Is This – The Vince Guaraldi Trio
14. Up North Here Where The Stars… 1945 – Linford Detweiler
15. Longest Year – Hammock
16. Adeste Fidelis – Bruce Cockburn

Now shut it, won’t you? Just shush.