Ten Top

I’ve heard some whining about the year in music, not-so-great, and I say pshaw. 2018 was lovely; there was so much good music that my top ten albums of the year didn’t even make it onto the high-profile end-of-year lists I’ve been reading. There’s enough hi-test material in 2018 to populate a thousand lists! I’ve given you a run-down of the run-up to this post (on Twitter), and I’ll probably recap those in a follow-on post. But here, at the end of all things 2018, is my Top Ten.

10. The Essex Green: Hardly Electronic

The Essex Green: Hardly Electronic
Surprise! It’s been over a decade since we saw anything from these gentle New York pop craftspersons, and I can’t imagine a better reunion opener than Sloane Ranger, with its golden Farfisa tones and classic harmonies. The band fairly skips through a masterclass multi-genre workout before waltzing back out of our lives again. Don’t wait another decade, please.

09. Natalie Prass: The Future And The Past

Natalie Prass: The Future and The Past
Prass’s pop-soul leanings get a shot in the arm on this follow-up to her self-titled debut. I can almost see her in the studio, dropping right into the pocket with her crack session musicians. Abe and I were a little obsessed with this album this summer: he learned Never Too Late on the piano, and I played Sisters probably one time too often. Prass’s delightful inversion of the Carpenter’s Close To You is as witty as a pop song gets. I can see this playing at parties for years to come.

08. Jon Hopkins: Singularity

Jon Hopkins: Singularity
When they talk about electronic/dance music being warm, or humanistic, or textured, or coaxing organic forms out of electrical impulses, I usually wonder what they mean. But in the future when I can’t put it into words, I’m going to point to this album. Emotionally affecting programmatic music; revelatory, even.

07. Amen Dunes: Freedom

Amen Dunes: Freedom
Damon McMahon’s mumbling, shambling, warbling, consonant-clipping and vowel-altering delivery gave me a thrilling emotional recall of the feelings I had listening to those early R.E.M. albums for the first time. And those R.E.M. albums were fundamental to my developing aesthetic for pop music. Combine that with McMahon’s expressed desire to write songs in the mode of Jackson’s Thriller and this album was probably always a surgical strike on my playlist this year. Hard to understand, impossible to ignore.

06. Dick Stusso: In Heaven

Dick Stusso: In Heaven
The flat drums, tamborine, and buzzing bass of Modern Music, under Stusso’s weary baritone and accented by bolts of electric guitar with the reverb on. When he sings “I’m just looking for a good time and a little cash,” well, that’s all I’m looking for too. And then he pushes the track into a weird effects-laden bridge, and drop-cuts the ending, and oh man, just take my money.

05. Emma Louise: Lilac Everything

Emma Louise: Lilac Everything
How do you set yourself apart from the myriad balladeers practicing mid-tempo lovesongs? Pitch-shift your voice down into androgynous territory, make yourself sound like a sensitive man, and then sing about sensitive men without changing your pronouns, so we’re forced to engage with the questions of love and desire from multiple angles at the same time. Brilliant.

04. S. Carey: Hundred Acres

S. Carey: Hundred Acres
This is the kind of delicate pastoral beauty I can lose myself in over and over forever. I don’t even care what it’s about, just keep singing and playing like this and I’m done for.

03. Rae Morris: Someone Out There

Rae Morris: Someone Out There
I’m not a radio pop person, but a few years of Taylor Swift/Lorde/Rihanna fandom from certain pre-teens in my household has fixed a crack in my hip-dad facade. I brought Morris’s album home and decided to like it unapologetically. And then I really did like it unapologetically, and it’s had wicked staying power over the year. Do It might be my platonic ideal of a perfect pop single. And the pre-teens liked it, too.

02. Caroline Rose: LONER

Caroline Rose: LONER
I had this locked down in February.

01. Wye Oak: The Louder I Call, The Faster It Runs

Wye Oak: The Louder I Call, The Faster It Runs
I didn’t get Jenn Wasner before, but I’m 100% on board now. Call it clarity, transparency– whatever she was trying to communicate, it finally clicked in her songwriting here. Plaintive, inventive, trancendental, rhythmic. Burns down the whole barn at times. I listen to this album and I just don’t want it to end: this kind of wall-to-wall energetic, creative rock experience is the gold standard.

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